Dr. N.N.W. (Nadine) Akkerman

Position:
  • Lecturer
Expertise:
  • English language and culture


Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 2152
E-Mail: n.n.w.akkerman@hum.leidenuniv.nl
Faculty / Department: Faculteit der Geesteswetenschappen, Centre for the Arts in Society, Moderne Engelstalige letterkunde
Office Address: Witte Singel-complex
P.N. van Eyckhof 4
2311 BV Leiden
Room number 1.06a
Personal Homepage: hum.leiden.edu/​lucas/​organisation/​members/​akkermannnw.html


Fields of interest

Queen of Bohemia 1603-1631

Queen of Bohemia 1603-1631

Manuscript cultures, palaeography, textual studies, women's history, cryptography (secret modes of writing), and Early modern English literature.

One of my main interests is textual studies as I am currently editing the complete correspondence of Elizabeth Stuart (1596-1662), Queen of Bohemia (to be published by Oxford University Press): 

Vol. I:                1603-1631 (2015) 
Vol. II:               1632-1642 (published 25 Aug. 2011)
Vol. III:              1643-1662 (forthcoming 2017) 


Queen of Bohemia 1632-1642

Queen of Bohemia 1632-1642

The edition is also supported by the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (CELL), UCL, of which I am an Associate member.

My advisory editors are Prof. Lisa Jardine (CELL) and Prof. Steve Murdoch (University of St Andrews).


Research

In February 2011 I concluded the RUBICON project “Enigmatic Cultures of Cryptography, 1603-1642”. Using the unpublished letters of Elizabeth Stuart, the aim of my research was to analyse what the role of cryptography is in early seventeenth-century newsletters, and to assess what – next to the level of protecting information – might have been other profound reasons for its use. In the first half of the seventeenth century in particular, cryptography also had a social function, to bind members into a group or faction, creating its own secretive language.

In March 2015, I concluded the research for my VENI project “Female Spies or 'she-Intelligencers': Towards a Gendered History of Seventeenth-Century Espionage”. In the academic year of 2015-2016, as fellow at The Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Sciences (NIAS), I will take my VENI research further by working on a project entitled “Visualizing Cryptographic Networks of Spies, Diplomats and Scientists, 1603-1701”.

"Visualizing Cryptographic Networks" will enhance the completion of a monograph with the design of an open access web-laboratory.

My monograph argues that the role of female spies in seventeenth-century Europe was much more extensive than hitherto assumed. The male world of the spy was permeated by women. During my research, analyzing cipher keys unearthed proof of female intelligencers, and the wider networks of which they formed a part, the hubs where intelligence circulated. Cryptography is the preferred language not only of spies, but also of diplomats, military leaders and scientists. I plan to design an interactive web laboratory, in which cipher keys can be added, stored, shared, broken and searched, a tool which will enable scholars from different fields to map the operations of hidden networks.

My publication -Courtly Rivals: Elizabeth Stuart (1596-1662) and Amalia von Solms (1602-1675) in The Hague- appeared on the occasion of an exhibition of the same name at the Historical Museum in The Hague ('Het Haags Historisch Museum') held between 24 October 2014 and 15 March 2015.

My publication -Courtly Rivals: Elizabeth Stuart (1596-1662) and Amalia von Solms (1602-1675) in The Hague- appeared on the occasion of an exhibition of the same name at the Historical Museum in The Hague ('Het Haags Historisch Museum') held between 24 October 2014 and 15 March 2015.

Prizes

My research activities have been supported, among others, by the Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds, NWO, and the British Academy. In 2009 I have been awarded the Studieprijs Stichting Praemium Erasmianum, a national award, for the completion of an extraordinary PhD in the field of humanities, social sciences or behavioral sciences.

Curriculum vitae

I studied English Language and Literature at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam from 1996 to 2001. In November 2008 I was awarded my PhD in English Literature 'cum laude' (with distinction) for a dissertation entitled, “The Letters of A Stuart Princess: The Correspondence of Elizabeth Stuart, Electress Palatine of the Rhine, and Queen of Bohemia”.
Besides a fully annotated edition of the years 1632-42, my dissertation includes a census of all the letters, either to or by the Queen of Bohemia, many of which are dispersed in archives across the world and mostly unpublished.

September 2015 – June 2016
Fellow at The Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Sciences (NIAS)

1 March 2011  - 1 March 2015
VENI postdoc at Leiden University Centre for the Arts in Society (LUCAS)

27 May 2014 – 4 July 2014
Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies, University of Birmingham

1 February 2010 - 28 February 2011
RUBICON postdoc at Leiden University's Institute for History
 
Since 1 September 2007 –                              
Lecturer, Leiden University  

1 August 2006 – 1 August 2007
Junior lecturer Radboud University Nijmegen  

1 September 2002 – 9 December 2006
PhD student / Junior lecturer Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam

Teaching activities

In the academic year of 2015-2016, I will be on research leave.

Last Modified: 10-12-2015